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Java Web Services Training

(This course is designed for individual group and can be customized according to business need.) view class outline

This class prepares Java™ programmers to develop interoperable Java Web services and using SOAP, WSDL, and XML Schema. Students get an overview of the interoperable and Java-specific Web services architectures, and then learn the standard APIs for SOAP messaging and WSDL-driven, component-based service development. Both document-style and RPC-style messages and services are covered in depth.

Course No: DG-J105 view class outline Course Duration: 6 Days (48 Hrs.) Ratio of Hands-on/Lecture:
70% hands-on/practical, 30% lecture.
view class outline
S/W Required: JDK 6 or higher version, Eclipse 3.5, Tomcat 7, MySQL 5, comprehensive lab files provided by us. Location and Pricing : Price of training depends on location and mode of training class. To receive a customized proposal and price quote Get A Quote Read More...

Java Web Services Training Prerequisites

Training Material

Attendees receive more than 400 pages of comprehensive courseware and a copy of Addison-Wesley's J2EE Web Services.

Software Needed on Each Student PC

Java Web Services Training Objectives

After this training, attendees shall be able to:

  • Be able to describe the interoperable web services architecture, including the roles of SOAP and WSDL.
  • Understand the importance of the WS-I Basic Profile for interoperable web services.
  • Build JAX-WS services and clients that take full advantage of the automated data binding of JAXB.
  • Use lower-level SOAP and XML APIs for services and/or clients.
  • Customize data binding by specifying specific type mappings or altering method or parameter names.
  • Expose session beans as web services.
  • Incorporate binary data, such as images, into service and client code.

Java Web Services Training Outline

1. Overview of Web Services
  • Why Web Services?
  • Service-Oriented Architecture
  • HTTP and XML
  • Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP)
  • Web Service Description Language (WSDL)
  • Universal Description, Discovery and Integration (UDDI)
  • The WS-I Basic and Related Profiles
  • REST
2. Web Services for Java EE
  • Hosting Web Services: Scenarios
  • Invoking Web Services: Scenarios
  • Web Services for Java EE (WS4JEE)
  • The Automated Approach: JAX-WS and JAXB
  • Manual Options: SAAJ and JAXP
  • Portable Web-Services Metadata
  • Service Registries: JAXR
3. The Simple Object Access Protocol
  • Messaging Model
  • Namespaces
  • SOAP over HTTP
  • The SOAP Envelope
  • The Message Header
  • The Message Body
  • SOAP Faults
  • Attachments
4. The Java API for XML Binding
  • The Need for Data Binding
  • XML Schema
  • Two Paths
  • JAXB Compilation
  • Mapping Schema Types to Java
  • Java-to-XML Mapping Using Annotations
  • Marshaling and Unmarshaling
  • Working with JAXB Object Models
  • In-Memory Validation
5. Web Services Description Language
  • Web Services as Component-Based Software
  • The Need for an IDL
  • Web Services Description Language
  • WSDL Information Model
  • The Abstract Model -- Service Semantics
  • Message Description
  • Messaging Styles
  • The Concrete Model -- Ports, Services, Locations
  • Extending WSDL -- Bindings
  • Service Description
6. The Java API for XML-Based Web Services
  • Two Paths
  • How It Works: Build Time and Runtime
  • The Service Endpoint Interface
  • Working from WSDL
  • Working from Java
  • RPC and Document Styles
  • One-Way Messaging
  • Binary Protocols
7. WSDL-to-Java Development
  • The @WebService Annotation
  • Generated Code
  • Compilation and Assembly
  • Deployment
  • Runtime Behavior
  • Scope of Code Generation
  • More JAXB: Mapping Collections
  • More JAXB: Mapping Enumerations
8. Client-Side Development
  • Stubs and Proxies
  • Generated Code
  • Locating a Service
  • Invoking a Service
9. Java-to-WSDL Development
  • The @WebMethod, @XmlParam, and Related Annotations
  • Scope of Code Generation
  • More JAXB: Mapping Inheritance
  • Controlling the XML Model
  • Controlling the WSDL Description
10. JAX-WS Best Practices
  • Which Way to Go?
  • Interoperability Impact
  • Portability Impact
  • Polymorphism in Web Services
  • Web Services as Java EE Components
  • lifecycle Annotations
  • Context Interfaces
  • The @WebServiceRef Annotation
11. Provider and Dispatch APIs
  • Stepping Down
  • The Provider<T> Interface
  • Implementing a Provider
  • JAXB Without WSDL
  • Integrating JAXP
  • The Dispatch<T> Interface
  • Building Clients
12. The SOAP with Attachments API for Java
  • The SAAJ Object Model
  • Parsing a SOAP Message
  • Reading Message Content
  • Working with Namespaces
  • Creating a Message
  • Setting Message Content
13. Message Handlers
  • Handling SOAP Headers
  • Servlet Endpoint Context
  • MessageContext and SOAPMessageContext
  • Message Handlers and Handler Chains
  • Processing Model and Patterns
  • Client-Side Handlers
14. EJBs as Web Services
  • Enterprise JavaBeans
  • Three Tiers for Java EE
  • EJB3 and JAX-WS
  • Session Beans as Web Service Endpoints
  • The Bean's Service Endpoint Interface
  • SOAP as an EJB Protocol
  • Pitfalls
15. Handling Binary Content
  • The WS-I Attachments Profile
  • Using base64Binary
  • MIME Attachments
  • JAX-WS Support
  • MTOM and XOP
  • SAAJ Support

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